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Children's Toys / Products

Lead and Cadmium in Talc and other Baby ProductsiStock_000015431540XSmall

Following a Proposition 65 complaint, a consumer products manufacturer asked Cardno ChemRisk to evaluate the potential for exposure to lead and cadmium in talc and other baby products. Cardno ChemRisk scientists conducted a risk assessment that evaluated the likelihood that trace amounts of lead and cadmium in talc and zinc oxide ointment in baby products might penetrate the skin and produce an absorbed dose in excess of the California Proposition 65 “safe harbor” concentration.

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Formaldehyde and DEHP in Tagless Labels of Children’s Clothingtagless_printing

Cardno ChemRisk was asked to evaluate the potential for formaldehyde and DEHP in the ink used for tagless labels of children’s garments to cause dermatitis in the contact area.  Based on the scientific literature and manufacturers’ testing, Cardno ChemRisk scientists conducted a literature search and evaluated the manufacturer’s testing data to understand the potential for children’s exposure to the chemicals from the tagless labels. Based on this information, we concluded that the concentrations of formaldehyde and DEHP detected in the labels would not cause contact dermatitis.  Cardno ChemRisk also conducted an exposure assessment of DEHP in this product and determined that a Proposition 65 warning was not required as the concentration was below the maximum allowable dose.

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Ground Recycled Tires in Playgrounds and Athletic Fieldsplayground

Although recycling end-of-life tires is one way to prevent the unlawful stockpiling or landfill disposal of used tires, there is growing concern among various Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) regarding the health risk associated with chemicals in the rubber crumb used to “cushion” playgrounds and athletic synthetic turf fields. Cardno ChemRisk was retained by the Rubber Manufacturer’s Association to evaluate and summarize literature about the risks associated with using ground rubber from recycled tires in these applications, and to develop a comprehensive assessment of the safety of this product for both consumers (adults and children) and the environment. Because ground rubber represents a product that contains and, in some cases, releases a variety of chemicals with no known screening criteria and sparse toxicity datasets, a qualitative approach was required to understand the risks associated with exposure to the whole product. We reviewed a variety of literature, including toxicity and bioavailability studies, as well as exposure and risk assessments, to formulate a comprehensive assessment of the human health risks associated with using ground rubber in these applications. See this publication for more information.