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Epidemiology

Posted by on in Epidemiology
Over the past several weeks, the National Football League (NFL) has once again faced increased scrutiny regarding its response to concussion-related health effects.  The league’s top official for the health and safety of players only recently formally acknowledged the link between playing football and degenerative brain disorders, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).  And last week, the New York Times raised more questions about the legitimacy of NFL-funded concussion research conducted by the league’s Mild Traumatic Brain Injury committee in the 1990s and 2000s.  Here, we continue our discussion of occupational injuries sustained by NFL players.  Our previous post can be found on our website

Perhaps overshadowed by the publicity surrounding the aforementioned issues, last week the league approved several new rule changes for the upcoming 2016 season, many of which are intended to protect players from injury.  One noteworthy change will move touchbacks from the 20- to the 25-yard line.  This rule is intended to protect players by discouraging returns made during kickoffs, plays that have especially high injury rates.  Our recent study of the effects of the NFL’s 2011 amendments to the Free Kick rule, changes that were similarly aimed at reducing the incidence of injuries during kickoffs, demonstrated that almost all of the positive effects of the rule changes were attributable to a decrease in active gameplay rather than to safer gameplay (see abstract here).  We additionally showed that, though kickoff injury rates decreased, the types of injuries suffered, including those to the head, did not significantly change.  Our study highlights the need for detailed assessments of injury prevention interventions to understand exactly how they influence injuries and why. 

Furthermore, additional research into the mechanisms of and risk factors for sports injuries, particularly those that can lead to long-term disability, will be key to their prevention.  The need for the rapid collection and synthesis of such information has become critical to the viability of the game of football.  Our company’s collective expertise in program evaluation, risk assessment, study design, and data analysis can help organizations maximize the effectiveness of their injury prevention strategies, conduct high-quality research, and effectively disseminate findings. For more information about our work in this area, please contact Dr. Peter Ruestow.  
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Posted by on in Epidemiology

Posted on behalf of Dr. Peter Ruestow.

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Posted by on in Epidemiology
Chikungunya Fever, another example of a known infectious disease, has spread throughout the Caribbean, Central and South America. Learn about the disease and the countries that have reported cases here.
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Posted by on in Epidemiology

Four ChemRisk epidemiologists have returned from an excellent conference week in Boston. We participated in pre-meeting workshops on systematic reviews and directed acyclic graphs, learned tools for writing for specific epidemiology journals, attended plenary sessions and presented four posters.  It was a great week to catch up with old colleagues and learn about new research methods to better perform our work. We are already looking forward to next year in Seattle!

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Posted by on in Epidemiology

The SER is an association of epidemiologists dedicated to fostering epidemiologic research by sponsoring publications and educational opportunities.  Cardno ChemRisk epidemiologists are well represented with four posters being presented:

  1. Chrysotile Asbestos Exposure and Ovarian Cancer: Is There an Association?
  2. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Refinery Workers and Risk of Mesothelioma
  3. The Impact of Neighborhood Traffic Density and Deprivation on Lung Function among Children with Asthma
  4. Residential and Occupational Exposure to Wood Treating Operations as Risk Factors for Bladder Cancer
We are looking forward to participating in pre-meeting workshops and attending many of the symposia this year on topics related to environmental and occupational health research.  Look for us in the poster sessions!
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