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Posted by on in Policy/Regulatory Support

California's Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) adopted a temporary emergency regulation on April 18, 2016, which implemented warning label method and content provisions specifically for exposures to BPA from canned and bottled foods and beverages sold at retail level. Effective May 11, 2016, BPA exposure warnings must be affixed to the product container or, alternatively, posted on a sign at each point-of-sale (cash register, check-out line) in the retail location; in addition, the emergency regulation stipulates strict warning language requirements that specify the chemical of interest and its health endpoint of concern ("harm to the female reproductive system"). The provisions in the emergency regulation are in effect until October 17, 2016.

On July 29, 2016, OEHHA issued a notice of proposed rulemaking to continue the emergency BPA warning regulation provisions until December 30, 2017. However, this new regulation limits the scope of the point-of-sale warning provisions. To utilize point-of-sale warning signs rather than individual product labels, food and beverage companies that intentionally use BPA must submit the following product identifying information in a "searchable, electronic format" to OEHHA:

• Brand name

• Product description, including FDA product category

• Universal Product Code or other identifying designation

• Where applicable, the last expiration or 'use by' date for the product(s) where BPA was intentionally used

Once submitted, OEHHA will publish the above information on its website, so that consumers can learn where BPA is intentionally used in food and beverage containers. A public hearing on the proposed regulatory amendment is scheduled for 10:00 a.m. on September 12, 2016 in the Sierra Hearing Room at the CalEPA Headquarters building 1001 I Street in Sacramento. The hearing will also be webcast.

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Posted by on in Centers of Excellence

Cardno ChemRisk scientist, Denise Hill, will be attending the August 9th and August 10th public meetings hosted by the EPA regarding the amended Toxic Substances Control Act.

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Posted by on in Centers of Excellence

Posted on behalf of the author, Allison Insley.

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Posted by on in Centers of Excellence
Our study, titled ""An Assessment of Formaldehyde Emissions from Laminate Flooring Manufactured in China" was published in the Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology journal. We evaluated two laminate flooring products using both chamber testing (for California Air Resource Board [CARB] compliance) and a real-world, room-scale environment. Both products had been previously evaluated by CBS News.

Our general findings are as follows:

  1. One of the two delaminated products that we tested was found to not be in compliance with the current CARB standard; emissions from the other product were equivalent to the standard.
  2. Our chamber testing results were up to 9-fold lower than results that were previously documented by CBS News.
  3. Nonetheless, the actual airborne concentrations of formaldehyde measured following the installation of these products in a real-world setting were far below levels at which acute health effects are known to occur.

The abstract of the article can be found on the journal's website and a brief presentation of our results can be found here. If you would like a full copy of the paper, or if you have any questions regarding its content, please contact Dr. Jennifer Pierce.
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Posted by on in Centers of Excellence
Posted on behalf of the author, Allison Insley

Cardno ChemRisk employees conducted a three-month air monitoring study to evaluate the potential community health risks resulting from air emissions from a hydraulic fracturing well pad that was being actively developed in Washington County, PA. This study was performed pro bono at the request of local community members who were concerned about the potential risks that this natural gas development could pose to their children, considering that the well pad was located within 900 m of a school complex. The ambient air at two locations, a local residence and the school, was continuously monitored for total volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hydrogen sulfide, percent lower explosive limit, and carbon monoxide, and was periodically monitored for 24-hour averages of a set of 62 individual VOCs. Over the three month sampling period, Cardno ChemRisk was able to obtain continuous air monitoring data representative of background conditions and while hydraulic fracturing and flaring occurred on the well pad.

In addition to communicating the air monitoring results to the local community members at the study's conclusion, Cardno ChemRisk scientists Julie Panko, Erin Hynds, Joshua Maskrey, and Allison Insley recently published the total and individual VOC monitoring results in the July 2016 edition of the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Monitoring and Assessment. Overall, total VOC concentrations did not differ from the background concentrations measured prior to fracking, or those measured following the flaring period. Overall, total VOC concentrations ranged between 0.16 and 80 ppb during all sampling periods. Several individual VOCs were detected in the 24-hour samples, but they were consistent with background concentrations previously measured in the region. A screening-level health risk assessment performed based on these results demonstrated that the measured concentrations of individual VOCs were well below established health-protective levels. The authors concluded that hydraulic fracturing operations did not substantially affect local air concentrations of total or individual VOCs at this site in Washington County.

This study adds to the growing body of research related to unconventional natural gas development. This topic has received substantial attention over the last 15 years because of the specific processes necessary for releasing subsurface natural gas, and its oftentimes close proximity to highly populated areas, as was the case in this study.

An abstract of the manuscript, as well as the option to download the full text, is located here
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Cardno ChemRisk is a respected scientific consulting firm headquartered in San Francisco with locations and consultants across the U.S. While our website provides a formal look at our capabilities, the Cardno ChemRisk View provides an informal voice too. Various Cardno ChemRisk consultants will be sharing news and views about current trends, happenings and methodologies in the industry. We’ll also highlight activities of interest at Cardno ChemRisk, within confidentiality restrictions of course.

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