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Posted by on in Centers of Excellence
Posted on behalf of the author Paul Scott

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt on May 10, 2017 issued a memorandum revising the existing delegations of authority related to the approval of proposed remedies at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), or “Superfund” sites. In the memorandum, EPA Administrator Pruitt reserved his authority to make the remedy selection at CERCLA cleanup sites whose Record of Decision (ROD) had a proposed cleanup cost exceeding $50 million.   In the past, remedy selection decisions at these sites were performed by the Assistant Administrator for the Office of Land and Emergency Management and the Regional Administrators.  The stated purpose of Administrator Pruitt's delegation of this authority to his office for these sites was to improve the remedy selection process and to involve the Administrator and his office in the remedy selection process more directly.

This change in remedy selection authority will have a direct impact on contaminated sediment sites where the proposed remedy is often in the hundreds of millions of dollars let alone greater than 50 million dollars.  For most of the major contaminated sediment Superfund sites, the selected remedy will have to be approved by the Administrator instead of by a Regional Administrator or Assistant Administrator for the Office of Land and Emergency Management.  For perspective, the proposed costs for the remedies for the following sediment sites from their respective RODs:

  • Hudson River: $460 million 
  • Passaic River: $1.38 billion 
  • Fox River: $390 million
  • Lower Duwamish River: $342 million
  • Portland Harbor: $1.05 billion

The announcement and a link to the memo are located on the EPA website here.
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Posted by on in Occupational Health/IH
Two Cardno ChemRisk scientists recently passed the exam to become a Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH) - Jason Lotter in October 2016 and Rachel Zisook in May 2017. They join a team of 10 other CIHs in our firm. For more information, please contact Will Cyrs at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or (415) 618-3217.
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Posted by on in Centers of Excellence
We are excited to announce that one of our industrial hygienists, Mr. Thomas Slavin, received the best paper award at the 2017 American Foundry Society Metalcasting Congress, for the paper titled "Controlling Exposures to Air Contaminants in Metalcasting – a Performance-Based Approach". The paper, co-written with Mr. Robert Scholz, presents an approach to selecting controls for air contaminants in the metalcasting industry. It not only provides an evaluation of the current protocols used by the industry, but also provides foundries with additional guidelines to implement exposure control programs that are effective, reliable, and feasible. To learn more about the paper and about Cardno ChemRisk's capabilities, please contact Mr. Thomas Slavin.
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Posted by on in Centers of Excellence

Posted on behalf of the authors, Lindsey Garnick and Kevin Towle

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Posted by on in Centers of Excellence
Posted on behalf of the author, Christina Trusty

Cardno ChemRisk presented an abstract at the 2017 Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland titled, “Risk Assessment for the Consumption of Ochratoxin A (OTA) in Breakfast Cereals in the US”.

Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a naturally occurring mycotoxin and is a stable contaminant found in the production and storage of cereals and grains. OTA is of interest, as it has been shown to cause kidney tumors in mice and rats, and is classified as a Group 2B carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Additionally, Health Canada has derived a negligible cancer risk intake (NCRI) of 4 ng/kg bw/day, corresponding to a 1 in 100,000 risk level, based on a TD05 of 19.6 μg/kg bw/day and a safety factor of 5000. In the U.S., there is currently no health based guidance value for OTA.

In our analysis, we assessed the potential cancer risks associated with consumption of OTA in different grain-based cereals in the U.S. OTA intake was estimated using the mean and maximum estimates of U.S. cereal consumption (various age groups, as reported in the EPA 2011 Exposure Factor Handbook) and mean OTA levels in grain-based U.S. cereals (as calculated from published literature).

Our results illustrated that OTA doses associated with mean cereal consumption rates are below the NCRI “negligible cancer risk” dose. The OTA doses associated with maximum consumption rates approach the NCRI value for several cereal types and exceed the NCRI for conventional oat cereal. Therefore, we concluded that the risk of cancer in the U.S. from OTA exposure is not likely to be of concern based on mean estimates of U.S. cereal consumption and mean OTA levels in grain-based cereals. However, under conditions of high consumption of oat cereal the OTA intake exceeds the NCRI.
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