AddThis Social Bookmark Button

The Cardno ChemRisk View

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Archives
    Archives Contains a list of blog posts that were created previously.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Recent blog posts

Posted by on in Staff Activities

Cardno ChemRisk staff across the country celebrated Pi Day (March 14, 2017) while enjoying slices of pie and conversations about mathematics. Pi Day is an annual, worldwide celebration of the mathematical constant pi and is observed on March 14th since pi is approximately equal to 3.14 (out to three significant figures).  Pi is the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter, and it is commonly represented in mathematics by the greek letter π.  Pi is the same value for all circles of any size, has been calculated to over one trillion digits beyond its decimal point, and will continue infinitely without repetition or pattern (as it is an irrational and transcendental number).  To learn more facts about pi or Pi Day, please visit: http://www.piday.org/.

...
Continue reading
Hits: 779
Rate this blog entry:

Posted by on in Centers of Excellence

Posted on behalf of the authors, Michael Ierardi and Dr. Marisa Kreider.

...
Continue reading
Hits: 693
Rate this blog entry:
Posted by on in Centers of Excellence
Cardno ChemRisk recently presented an analysis examining the cancer risk associated with residential exposure to radioactive components in soils containing coal combustion residuals (CCRs) at the 2017 Society of Toxicology (SOT) annual conference. CCRs are waste products created as a result of burning coal at power plants during the production of electricity, and are one of the largest industrial waste streams generated in the United States. In 2012, approximately 40 percent of CCRs were beneficially used (i.e. concrete and wallboard), while the remaining 60 percent were disposed of in surface impoundments and landfills. Coal and CCRs are composed of various constituents, including naturally occurring radioactive materials. For our research, Cardno ChemRisk scientists utilized reported mean and upper bound isotope-specific radioactivity values to calculate the potential human health cancer risks associated with residential exposure to CCR-containing soil via ingestion of soil, inhalation of particulates emitted from soil, and external exposure to ionizing radiation. The mean cancer risk was 7 x 10-9, and the upper bound cancer risk was 1 x 10-8. Both the mean and upper bound calculated cancer risks were below the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) acceptable risk threshold of 1 x 10-6 to 1 x 10-4. These findings suggest that residents living on lots with ground soil containing CCRs are not at an increased risk of cancer due to the presence of naturally occurring radioactive components in CCRs under the exposure parameters analyzed.

If you would like to learn more about Cardno ChemRisk's experience with coal ash, please contact Paul Scott
Hits: 1482
Rate this blog entry:
Posted by on in Centers of Excellence
Cardno ChemRisk scientists have published a white paper titled "community-focused risk assessment: a valuable tool for manufactured gas plant site remediation". The white paper explains the importance of assessing a community's potential risk from chemical exposures during the remediation of an MGP site. The approach develops airborne fenceline concentration objections (FCOs) for chemicals of concern that are health-protective of all members of a community. Air monitoring concentrations collected during remediation are then compared to the FCOs to ensure that there is no potential risk to community members throughout remediation. Communication distributed throughout this process can also mitigate the concerns of community members and avoid negative publicity and possible litigation. This method can be applied to many remediation scenarios and is tailored towards a community more so than comparison of monitored concentrations to regulatory standards.

Please contact Erin Hynds with any questions.
Hits: 1287
Rate this blog entry:
Posted by on in Centers of Excellence
Cardno ChemRisk scientists recently published History of Knowledge and Evolution of Occupational Health and Regulatory Aspects of Asbestos Exposure Science: 1900-1975" in the Critical Reviews in Toxicology journal.  The article provides a comprehensive review regarding the evolution of the foundation of occupational medicine and industrial hygiene knowledge with respect to asbestos and its risks from the early 1900s until the early-to-mid 1970s. In this review, we present the decisions, insights, challenges, and hallmark scientific discoveries that had the greatest impact on the historical actions of industrial hygienists in characterizing asbestos exposure and risk. 

If you have any questions or would like further information, please contact Dr. Christy Barlow at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or (720) 305-5837.
Hits: 1682
Rate this blog entry: