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Posted by on in Centers of Excellence

**Change of location for symposium. New location: Reed Smith Palo Alto, CA office

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Posted by on in Centers of Excellence
Recently, our study “An assessment of gender-specific risk of implant revision following primary total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review and meta-analysis” was published in the Journal of Arthroplasty (Towle and Monnot 2016). Scientists at Cardno ChemRisk synthesized and examined the evidence on the relative risk of revision in men and women following primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). THA surgeries involve the replacement of damaged hip joints with prosthetic components in an effort to mitigate hip pain. Over time, some THA surgeries require revision due to various modes of failure, such as dislocation, infection, or aseptic loosening. A better understanding of factors that influence the risk of revision due to hip implant failure would help reduce post-surgery complications. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to examine if males or females are at a higher risk of revision.

Overall, findings suggested that males are at an increased risk of revision following THA when compared to females. Additionally, this study provided evidence that gender-specific risk of revision may be impacted by geographic location (i.e. United States and Europe) and time period of THA operation (i.e. post-2000). The authors discussed potential risk factors for revision among male hip implant patients, including differences in hip anatomy, degree of surgical trauma during surgery, level of physical activity following surgery, as well as differences in primary care provider interactions.

The abstract of the article is available here.  If you have any questions regarding the paper, please contact Kevin Towle or Andrew Monnot.
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Posted by on in Occupational Health/IH
Dr. Anders Abelmann will be presenting on research related to formaldehyde emissions from laminate flooring during a roundtable session at the American Home Furnishings Alliance's (AHFA) Regulatory Summit in Hickory, NC, on September 15th. His presentation will be based on the findings recently published in Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, titled  An Assessment of Formaldehyde Emissions From Laminate Flooring Manufactured in China.  For more information, please visit either the AHFA website, or contact Dr. Anders Abelmann.
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Posted by on in Centers of Excellence

Posted on behalf of author, Angela Perez.

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Posted by on in Centers of Excellence
Scientists at Cardno ChemRisk recently published a study titled “Anthophyllite asbestos: state of the science review” in the Journal of Applied Toxicology. The purpose of this research was to provide a comprehensive review of the toxicological, epidemiological and regulatory knowledge regarding anthophyllite and to understand how it compares to other types of asbestos. It also serves to give an overview of the available published literature on anthophyllite, including the occurrence of anthophyllite in talc and related health effects.

The authors reviewed publicly available documents on anthophyllite discussing its use, mining, properties, toxicity, exposure, and any potential health hazards. Based on their research, the authors found that:

·         Anthophyllite has been less researched than other asbestos types.

·         Anthophyllite can be found as a trace element or contaminant of other asbestos or talc deposits.

·         In studies from the 1970s and onward, it was reported that significant anthophyllite exposure in animal studies can cause asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma.

·         A study of Finnish Anthophyllite miners in the 1970s found exposure to anthophyllite caused asbestosis and lung cancer, but not mesothelioma, which was not linked with human exposure to anthophyllite until the mid-1990s.

·         Because of the lack of research on anthophyllite specifically, characterizing the health risks associated with exposure is difficult.

Overall, the authors concluded that anthophyllite may be more potent than other types of asbestos in causing asbestosis, but less potent in causing mesothelioma. However, further research is needed to fully understand the toxicity of pure anthophyllite.

The abstract of the article is available here. If you would like a full copy of the paper, or if you have any questions regarding its content, please contact Dr. Shannon Gaffney.
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