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Posted by on in Centers of Excellence
In early 2017, a group of scientists met at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in Lyon, France to evaluate the carcinogenicity of welding fume. This evaluation included a review of relevant exposure data, studies of cancer in humans, studies of cancer in experimental animals, toxicokinetic data, and information on disease in susceptible populations. Based on this review, the IARC working group determined that  “sufficient evidence” exists that welding fume is a human lung carcinogen (Group 1) (Lancet 2017). Previously, IARC had classified welding fume as being “possibly carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2B) based on available data at the time that the mixture was evaluated in 1989 (IARC 1990).

A complicating factor in reclassifying welding fume is its complexity. Generally, welding fume is a mixture of metal fumes (i.e., iron, manganese, chromium, nickel, silicon, titanium) and gases (i.e., carbon monoxide, ozone, argon, carbon dioxide). Welding fume can contain varying concentrations of individual components that are classified as human carcinogens, including hexavalent chromium and nickel. However, the presence of such metals and the intensity of exposure to each differ significantly according to a number of variables, including the type of welding technique used and the composition of the base metal and consumable (IARC 1990). Nonetheless, IARC did not differentiate between these variables in its decision.

What actions should be taken as a results of IARC’s reclassification? 

1.       Update hazard communication programs to include information regarding welding fume now being classified as a Group 1 carcinogen.

2.       Update exposure assessments for welding fume, including both for welders and nearby workers who are not engaged in welding. Given that NIOSH guidance for carcinogens aims to keep exposures as low as feasible, documenting and characterizing the potential for exposures to bystanders such as welder helpers, fire watches, or workers located adjacent to welding operations is especially important.

3.       Develop similar exposure groups (SEGs) based on the exposure assessment, and determine appropriate control measures.

Cardno ChemRisk scientists have measured and assessed workplace and environmental exposures to numerous compounds, including welding fume, and have performed historical dose reconstructions or cumulative estimates of excess cancer risk in numerous occupational settings. In addition, Cardno ChemRisk scientists have experience deriving internal occupational exposure limits based on available toxicological data. If you have any questions, or would like more information about our environmental health and safety capabilities, please contact William Cyrs, CIH, at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

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Posted by on in Centers of Excellence
We are excited to announce that one of our industrial hygienists, Mr. Thomas Slavin, received the best paper award at the 2017 American Foundry Society Metalcasting Congress, for the paper titled "Controlling Exposures to Air Contaminants in Metalcasting – a Performance-Based Approach". The paper, co-written with Mr. Robert Scholz, presents an approach to selecting controls for air contaminants in the metalcasting industry. It not only provides an evaluation of the current protocols used by the industry, but also provides foundries with additional guidelines to implement exposure control programs that are effective, reliable, and feasible. To learn more about the paper and about Cardno ChemRisk's capabilities, please contact Mr. Thomas Slavin.
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Posted by on in Centers of Excellence
Keller and Heckman and Cardno ChemRisk are pleased to announce a seminar addressing Strategic Implications of TSCA Modernization on January 24, 2017 in Houston TX. Join Keller and Heckman's attorneys and scientists and Cardno ChemRisk's scientists for a comprehensive program on how business strategies will be affected by the new TSCA Modernization Act. This seminar have been especially designed for senior managers and in-house counsel to understand the changed landscape and the seminar will provide attendees with essential, insights into EPA's direction and challenges in implementing the new legislation.

Program highlights include:

1. Changes in Statutory Requirements

2. Changes in New Chemical Review

3. Wherefore Existing Chemicals

4. New Requirements for Confidential Business Information (CBI)

5. How to Strategically Prepare For the Risk Evaluation Process

6. Supply Chain Challenges

Following the first day, we will be offering an additional two-day seminar on January 25-26, 2017 for regulatory staff and scientists, titled Compliance Requirements for TSCA Modernization Seminar. The comprehensive program will focus on how changes in EPA's authority and responsibilities are changing the landscape for new chemicals and how EPA will regulate existing chemicals under the new TSCA Modernization Act. This two-day seminar is especially designed for technical staff and managers who are responsible for regulatory compliance. The program highlights include:

1. Changes in EPA's Statutory mandates

2. Changes in New Chemical Review

3. Wherefore Existing Chemicals

4. Confidential Business Information (CBI) Challenges

5. What's Going To Happen in Risk Evaluation?

6. PMN and Exemptions: New Data Requirements?

7. Inventory Changes and Updates

8. New Recordkeeping Requirements

9. Hazard Assessment

10. New Exposure Assessment Challenges

11. Risk Prioritization

12. Risk Assessments - Novel Approaches

A detailed program agenda will be released soon! Please fill out our form to join the notification list, or contact , or  for more information
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Posted by on in Toxicology

As in previous years, a group of researchers from Cardno ChemRisk will attend the 2016 Society of Toxicology's Annual Meeting in New Orleans from March 13-17. At SOT, we will present recent research during posters and presentations.

Between today and the start of the conference, the Cardno ChemRisk View will feature a series of presentations, as described by staff (you can read the 2015 entries here and here). First up is Lindsey Garnick from our San Francisco office:

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Posted by on in Epidemiology

Posted on behalf of Dr. Peter Ruestow.

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The Cardno ChemRisk View

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Cardno ChemRisk is a respected scientific consulting firm headquartered in San Francisco with locations and consultants across the U.S. While our website provides a formal look at our capabilities, the Cardno ChemRisk View provides an informal voice too. Various Cardno ChemRisk consultants will be sharing news and views about current trends, happenings and methodologies in the industry. We’ll also highlight activities of interest at Cardno ChemRisk, within confidentiality restrictions of course.

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